2017 GMC Acadia Introduces Industry-first GMC Rear Seat Reminder

The 2017 GMC Acadia is introducing an innovative feature that will help to save lives: the GMC Rear Seat Reminder. The accidental deaths of children and animals is unfortunately common—sleeping kids in the backseat are easy to forget about when you’re a busy parent, and even leaving them alone for a few minutes can be fatal.

The new Acadia—and probably, other brands and models in the future—is aiming to combat this with Rear Seat Reminder, which keeps track of when backseat doors are opened and reminds the driver to check the backseat when they’ve been opened within 10 minutes of the vehicle being driven.

GMC Rear Seat Reminder in the 2017 AcadiaThe feature doesn’t have radar to detect items in the backseat, so even if the Rear Seat Reminder doesn’t active for whatever reason, it’s important not to grow complacent.

This will also prove helpful in cases of theft, since items forgotten in the backseat are a major target for theft. According to GMC, almost 23% of cases of petty larceny in 2014 were from a car. Half of children under age 14 who die of in-vehicle heatstroke have been forgotten by caretakers.

What is Magnetic Ride Control?

Developed by General Motors in the early 2000s, Magnetic Ride Control is still in use today. First debuting on the 2002 Cadillac Seville STS, the system is in its third generation and is one of the most advanced suspension systems to ever hit the automotive market. Although it may seem complicated, Magnetic Ride Control is relatively easy to understand. Let us here at Richard Karr Motors explain.

Magnetic Ride Control makes use of an Electronic Control Unit and many sensors to read the road up to 1,000 times per second, making it the fastest reacting suspension system on the market. Capable of reading every crack, pothole, twist, and bump as the car crosses it, the system adjusts the shock absorbers accordingly. The end result is a smoother ride with less vibrations and improved cornering.

The Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 has Magnetic Ride ControlThe shock absorbers themselves are filled with a polymer fluid unique to the Magnetic Ride Control system. That fluid is filled with magnetized iron particles that can change their viscosity from a free-flowing liquid to dense rubber instantaneously. Electromagnetic coils wrap around the shock absorbers and send electric charges through the fluid, allowing it to adjust to road conditions.

Magnetic Ride Control is found in many track-oriented vehicles, including the new Chevrolet Camaro ZL1. Offering improved handling and a smoother ride, the system is perfect for the track and bumpy country roads alike.